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Treatment options for Lingual nerve damage

Surgery

Surgery is often used with success to treat lingual nerve injuries from trauma or tooth extraction.  Surgery for lingual nerve damage due to local anesthetic injection in the course of dental work is usually not recommended, and the jury is still out as to whether it has any place in the management of this type of injury.  

For trauma and tooth extraction injuries, the literature indicates good results from early intervention, so it is important to see an oral surgeon early in order to access whether you are a candidate, and when surgery might be appropriate.  Most data indicates that the surgery should be done within 6 months of the date of injury, and many recommend earlier intervention.  I would suggest finding an oral surgeon who has significant experience in this type of surgery, as you want the best chance for a good outcome or complete cure.  A local oral surgeon may be able to refer you to a surgeon who has expertise in this area.  The message boards on this site could be useful to ask additional questions in this areas.  

Palliation for Lingual Nerve Pain

If you have residual lingual nerve pain (painful tongue), it can be quite debilitating.  I personally have lingual nerve pain, so this is written with some experience.  You should seek out a Pain clinic that has experience with lingual nerve pain, or a local Pain clinic that is willing to get educated in this topic.  The following is my brief synopsis of what I have tried or been told for treatment of neuropathic pain resulting in chronic pain or burning.

Hypnosis and mind control

Pharmacologic (Drug)

Acupuncture

Capsaicin candies

Gum chewing

Tongue splints

Topical Lidocaine

Nerve block

Neurectomy

Suggestion Box

Please use the

DISCUSSION BOARD

See the Links for additional sites that provide information.

One professional organization is dedicated to oral facial pain, and members of this group may deal with this type of treatment themselves or know who does.  It is:

The American Academy of Orofacial Pain

 

02/20/02